Japanese Sake

About sake: Sake is a clear alcohol drink which is basically made by fermenting steamed rice with koji mold and water. Sake has about 15% alcohol. It's said that good water and rice make good sake.

Sake Varieties:Sake is divided into two kinds: futsu-shu (general sake) and tokutei mesho-shu (special sake). Tokutei meisho-shu are categorized by the degree of rice milling and the use of distilled alcohol like Honjozo-shu and Junmai-shu. Namazake is sake which has not been pasteurized. Any kind of sake can be namazake.

Honjozo-shu and Junmai-shu:

Honjozo-shu : Distilled alcohol is added. The degree of rice milling is under 70%, which means 30% of a rice grain is removed.

Junmai-shu : No distilled alcohol is added.

Ginjo-shu:

Ginjo-shu is sake which is fermented in low temperatures.

Ginjo-shu : The degree of rice milling is under 60%. Distilled alcohol is added.

Junmai-ginjo-shu : The degree of rice milling is under 60%. No distilled alcohol is added.

Dai-ginjo-shu : The degree of of rice milling is under 50%. Distilled alcohol is added.

Junmai-dai-ginjo-shu : The degree of of rice milling is under 50%. No distilled alcohol is added.

Drinking Sake:In general, ginjo-shu and namazake are chilled for drinking, and regular sake, honjozo-shu, and shunmai-shu are warmed for drinking.

Storing Sake:Buy a sake with recent bottling date. Sake usually lasts up to a year if it's kept properly. Sake is sensitive to the sunlight and the heat. It's best to store sake in the refrigerator or in a dark and cool place. Namazake must be stored in the refrigerator. Once a sake bottle is opened, keep it in the refrigerator.

Sake Uses:Sake is often used in Japanese cooking. Leftover sake is suitable for cooking. Sake can be used for cocktails or other drinks.



This product was added to our catalog on Thursday 15 July, 2010.